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Why every business should consider an open source point of sale system

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Why every business should consider an open source point of sale system

Point of sale (POS) systems have come a long way from the days of simple cash registers that rang up purchases. Today, POS systems can be all-in-one solutions that include payment processing, inventory management, marketing tools, and more. Retailers can receive daily reports on their cash flow and labor costs, often from a mobile device.


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afita
35 days ago
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Cluj-Napoca, România
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Jehanne: A Plan 9 based OS

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Jehanne is a new distributed operating system designed for programmers. The core values that lead the development are simplicity and security. Jehanne is a fork of Harvey (which in turn is a fork of Plan 9 from Bell Labs merged with Nix's kernel sources) but diverges from the design and conventions of its ancestors whenever they are at odds with its goals. Read about development progress made in 2016.
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afita
42 days ago
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Cluj-Napoca, România
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Jim Hall: The importance of the press kit

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I'd like to share a few lessons I've learned about creating a press kit. This helped us spread the word about our recent FreeDOS 1.2 release, and it can help your open source software project to get more attention.
I'm part of several open source software projects, but probably the one that I'll be remembered for is FreeDOS. As an open source software implementation of DOS, you might not think that FreeDOS will get much attention in today's tech news. Yet when we released FreeDOS 1.2 a few weeks ago, we got a ton of news coverage.

Slashdot was the first to write about FreeDOS 1.2, but we also saw coverage from Engadget Germany, LWN, Heise Online, PC Forum Hungary, FOSS Bytes, ZDNet Germany, PC Welt, Tom's Hardware, and Open Source Feed. And that's just a sample of the news! There were articles from the US, Germany, Japan, Hungary, Ukraine, Italy, and others.

In reading the articles people had written about FreeDOS 1.2, I realized something that was both cool and insightful: most tech news sites re-used material from our press kit.

You see, in the weeks leading up to FreeDOS 1.2, I assembled additional information and resources about FreeDOS 1.2 release, including a bunch of screenshots and other images of FreeDOS in action. In an article posted to our website, I highlighted the press kit, and added "If you are writing an article about FreeDOS, feel free to use this information to help you." And they did!

We track a complete timeline of interesting events on our FreeDOS History page, including links to articles. Comparing the press coverage from FreeDOS 1.0, FreeDOS 1.1 and FreeDOS 1.2, we definitely saw the most articles about FreeDOS 1.2. And unlike previous releases where only a few tech news websites wrote articles about FreeDOS and other news outlets mostly referenced the first few sites, the coverage of FreeDOS 1.2 was mostly original articles. Only a small handful were references to news items from other news sites.

I put that down to the press kit. With the press kit, journalists were able to quickly pull interesting information and quotes about FreeDOS, and find images they could use in their articles. For a busy journalist who doesn't have much time to write about a free DOS implementation in 2016, our press kit made it easy to create something fresh. And news sites love to write their own stories rather than link to other news sites. That means more eyeballs for them.

Here are a few lessons I learned from creating our press kit:
Include basic information about your open source software project.

What is your project about? What does it do? How is it useful? Who uses it? What are the new features in this release? These are the basic questions any journalist will want to answer in their article, if they choose to write about you. In the FreeDOS press kit, I also included a history about FreeDOS, discussing how we got started in 1994 and some highlights from our timeline.

Write in a casual, conversational tone that's easy to quote.

In writing about your project, pretend you are writing an email to someone you know. Or if you prefer, write like you are posting something to a personal blog. Keep it informal. Avoid jargon. If your language is too stuffy or too technical, journalists will have a hard time quoting from you. In writing the FreeDOS press kit, I started by listing a few common questions that people usually ask me about FreeDOS, then I just responded to them like I was answering an email. My answers were often long, but the paragraphs were short so easier to skim.

Provide lots of screenshots of your project doing different things.

Whether your program runs from the command line or in a graphical environment, screenshots are key. And tech news sites like to use images; they are a cheap way to draw attention. So take lots of screenshots and include them in your press kit. Show all the major features through these screenshots. But be wary of background images and other branding that might distract from your screenshots. In particular, if the screenshot will show your desktop, set your wallpaper to the default for your operating system, or use a solid color in the range medium- to light-blue. For the FreeDOS press kit, I took a ton of screenshots of every step in the install process. I also grabbed screenshots of FreeDOS at the command line, running utilities and tools, and playing some of the games we installed.

Organize your material so it's easy to read.

You may find your press kit will become quite long. That's okay, as long as this doesn't make it difficult for someone to figure out what's there. Put the important stuff first. Use a table of contents, if you have a lot of information to share. Use headings and sections to break things up. If a journalist can't find the information they need to write an article about your project, they may skip it and write about something else. I organized our press kit like a simple website. An index page provided some basic information, with a list of links to other material contained in the press kit. I arranged our screenshots in separate "pages." And every page of screenshots started with a brief context, then listed the screenshots without much fanfare. But every screenshot included a description of what you were seeing. For example, I had over forty screenshots from installing FreeDOS, and I wrote a one-sentence description for each.

Be your own editor.

No matter how much work you put into it, one will want to use your press kit if it is riddled with spelling errors and poor grammar. Consider writing your press kit material in a word processor and running a spell check against it. Read your text aloud and see if it makes sense to you. When you're done, try to look at your press kit from the perspective of someone who hasn't used your project before. Can they easily understand what it's about? To help you in this step, ask a friend to review the material for you.

Advertise, advertise, advertise!

Don't assume that tech news sites will seek you out. You need to reach out to them to let them know you have a new release coming up. Create your press kit well in advance, and about a week or two before your release, individually email every journalist or tech news website that might be interested in you. Most news sites have a "Contact us" link or list of editor "beats" where you can direct yourself to the writer or editor most likely to write about your topic. Craft a short email that lets them know who you are, what project you're from, when the next release will happen, and what new features it will include. Give them a link to the press kit directly in your email. But make the press kit easy to see in the email. Use the full URL to the press kit, and make it clickable. Also link to the press kit from your website, so anyone else who visits your project can quickly find the information they need to write an article.
By doing a little prep work before your next major release, you can increase the likelihood that others will write about you. And that means you'll get more people who discover your project, so your open source software project can grow.
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afita
45 days ago
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Cluj-Napoca, România
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Smart Electricity Meters Can Be Dangerously Insecure, Warns Expert

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An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Smart electricity meters, of which there are more than 100 million installed around the world, are frequently "dangerously insecure," a security expert has said. The lack of security in the smart utilities raises the prospect of a single line of malicious code cutting power to a home or even causing a catastrophic overload leading to exploding meters or house fires, according to Netanel Rubin, co-founder of the security firm Vaultra. If a hacker took control of a smart meter they would be able to know "exactly when and how much electricity you're using," Rubin told the 33rd Chaos Communications Congress in Hamburg. An attacker could also see whether a home had any expensive electronics. "He can do billing fraud, setting your bill to whatever he likes [...] The scary thing is if you think about the power they have over your electricity. He will have power over all of your smart devices connected to the electricity. This will have more severe consequences: imagine you woke up to find you'd been robbed by a burglar who didn't have to break in. "But even if you don't have smart devices, you are still at risk. An attacker who controls the meter also controls the meter's software, allowing him to cause it to literally explode." The problems at the heart of the insecurity stem from outdated protocols, half-hearted implementations and weak design principles. To communicate with the utility company, most smart meters use GSM, the 2G mobile standard. That has a fairly well-known weakness whereby an attacker with a fake mobile tower can cause devices to "hand over" to the fake version from the real tower, simply by providing a strong signal. In GSM, devices have to authenticate with towers, but not the other way round, allowing the fake mast to send its own commands to the meter. Worse still, said Rubin, all the meters from one utility used the same hardcoded credentials. "If an attacker gains access to one meter, it gains access to them all. It is the one key to rule them all."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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afita
53 days ago
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Cluj-Napoca, România
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Advent Resource #19: LibreOffice Macros

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coverAndrew Pitonyak has been the great master of StarBasic since forever. I still remember copies of his book being distributed at the 2nd OpenOffice Conference in Berlin, in September 2004, the very first time I was exposed to the global OOo community (and I decided to embark on the journey that has led to the birth of LibreOffice and The Document Foundation).

Andrew Pitonyak’s OOo Macro Information website is full of useful information. The most useful resource is the 3rd edition of his book – OOo Macros Explained (OOME Third Edition) – available in both PDF and ODT formats.

These are the topics covered in the book: Language Constructs, Numerical Routines, Array Routines, Date Routines, String Routines, File Routines, Miscellaneous Routines, Universal Network Objects, The Dispatcher, StarDesktop, Generic Document Methods, Writer Documents, Calc Documents, Draw and Impress Documents, Library Management, Dialogs and Controls, and Sources of Information.

Just one caveat: although the book has been updated in 2015, it might not reflect all the changes included in the new versions of LibreOffice.

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afita
64 days ago
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Cluj-Napoca, România
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Advent Resource #18: Croscore Fonts

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apmicrosoftofficefontsA frequently­ overlooked point of lock­-in with Microsoft Office is its default use of proprietary fonts. Contrary to the popular view, fonts are often not freely distributable, and may in fact be covered by restrictive license terms similar to proprietary software. Microsoft Office by default uses two such fonts: Calibri and Cambria. These fonts are only available in Microsoft Office, and are not freely available for download or use otherwise.

Apertura Designs of Auckland, New Zealand, has issued a small guide to explain how to replace Microsoft proprietary Calibri and Cambria fonts with their open equivalents Carlito and Caladea. The PDF guide is available without restrictions from the following link.

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afita
65 days ago
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Cluj-Napoca, România
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